The record of Luke
Events relating to the birth of Christ

 

 


 

The question we must now ask
is whether the references to Mary relating to the birth of Christ, especially
 by Luke, support the colossal weight of her hyperdulia veneration, adoration, supplication and exaltation.
Examine the following facts and judge for yourself. 

 

 

Words in the Gospel of Luke frequently used to support
hyperdulia veneration, adoration, supplication and elevation of Mary


References:
The birth of Jesus foretold by Gabriel: Luke 1: 26 - 38 / Mary's visit to Elizabeth: Luke 1: 39 - 44 /
Mary's song: Luke 1: 47 - 56
 

'Hail, thou art highly favoured, the Lord is with thee: blessed art thou among women.'

Biblical meaning: Hail: (Greek - Chairo - meaning:  to rejoice, be glad,  to rejoice exceedingly, to be well, thrive, in salutations, hail, at the beginning of letters, to give one greeting, salute).

Usage:

It is used 74 times in the New Testament.

It is variously translated as: rejoice, rejoiced, rejoicing, rejoiceth, glad, be glad, greeting, joy, joyfully, farewell, God speed and hail.

It is an expression of salutation not veneration

Question:
Does the word 'Hail', used by the Angel Gabriel, support the veneration, adoration, supplication and exaltation of Mary?

Answer:
NO.

 

'Hail, thou art highly favoured, the Lord is with thee: blessed art thou among women.'

Biblical meaning: Highly favoured: (Greek - charitoo - meaning: to endow with grace).

Usage: It is only used twice in the New Testament. Luke 1:28 & Eph.1:6.

In Eph.1:6.,  Paul tells all the Christians at Ephesus that they are highly favoured. It means “much grace.” They had received much grace - they were 'accepted in the beloved'.

Mary received God’s grace too. There is nothing in the text to suggest that Mary is the dispenser of grace. She was its recipient. Grace is “unmerited favour”. It means something we receive despite the fact that we do not deserve it.

Mary needed grace from God just as we all do. Mary realised this and declared in 1:47, '...and my spirit rejoices in God my Saviour...' She freely acknowledged that she needed the Saviour.

The Bible clearly presents Mary as a godly young woman and highly favoured (graced) by God (Luke 1:27-28). At the same time, Mary was a sinful human being who needed Jesus Christ as her Saviour, just like everyone else (Ecclesiastes 7:20; Romans 3:23; 6:23; 1 John 1:8).

Mary did not have an 'immaculate conception'. The Bible doesn’t suggest Mary’s birth was anything but a normal human birth. Mary was a virgin when she gave birth to Jesus (Luke 1:34-38), but the idea of the perpetual virginity of Mary is wholly unbiblical. 

Question:
Do these words, 'highly favoured',  used by the Angel Gabriel, support the veneration, adoration, supplication and exaltation of Mary?

Answer: NO.

 

'Hail, thou art highly favoured, the Lord is with thee: blessed* art thou among women.'

There are two different Greek words for 'blessed'.
(1) Blessed - eulogeo - 44 times, eulogetos - 8 times,  eulogia - 16 times
Biblical meaning: to speak well of, to praise.

We use the same word today - eulogy. Gal.3:9 states, 'So they which be of faith are blessed (same word) with faithful Abraham.' Judges 5:24, tells us twice that Jael the wife of Heber was 'blessed above women'. Are we to prayer to and venerate her? Undoubtedly not!

References: Matt.5:44, 14:19, 21:9, 23:39, 25:34, 26:26, Mark 6:41, 8:7, 10:16, 11:9, 11:10, 14:22, Luke 1:28 (Used by Gabriel? Not in best Greek Texts), 1:42 (Used by Elizabeth), 1:64, 2:28, 2:34, 6:28, 9:16, 13:35, 19:38, 24:30, 24:50, 24:51, 24:53, John 12:13, Acts 3:26, Rom. 12:14, 1Cor.4:12, 1Cor.10:16, 14:16, Gal. 3:9, Eph.1:3, Heb. 6:14, Heb. 7: 1, Heb.7:6, 7:7, 11:20, 11:21, James 3:9, 1Pet. 3:9.

Mark14:61, Luke 1:68, Rom. 1:25, 9:5, 2 Cor. 1:3, 11:31, Eph.1:3 & 1Pet.1:3.(8)

Rom.15:29, 16:18, 1Cor.10:16, 2 Cor.9:5, (2), 9:6, (2), Gal.3:14, Eph.1:3, Heb.6:7, 12:17, James 3:10, 1 Pet.3:9, Rev. 5:12, 13, Rev. 7:12.(16)

(2) Blessed - makarios - 50 times, makarizo - 2 times, makarismos - 3 times
Biblical meaning: fortunate, well off, blessed, happy.
 
References: Matt. 5:3,4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,10,11. Matt.11:6, 13:16, 16:17, 24:46, Luke 1:45, 6:20, 21, 22, Luke 7:23, 10:23, 11:27, 28, Luke 12:37, 38, Luke 12:43, 14:14, 15, 23:29, John 13:17, 20:29, Acts 20:35, 26:2, Rom. 4:7, 8, Rom.14:14,15, 1Cor. 7:40, 1Tim. 1:11, 6:15, Titus 2:13, James 1:12, 1:25, 1 Pet. 3:14, 4:14, Rev. 1:3, 14:13, 16:15, 19:9, 20:6, 22:7, 22:14.

Luke 1:48 (used by Mary) & James 5:11(2)

Rom. 4:6, 4:9, Gal. 4:15.(3)

Note: It is used by Matthew 9 times in the Sermon on the Mount. 'Blessed are the poor in spirit' etc. Luke uses it three times in a similar connection in Chapter 6. The word used by Mary  in Luke 1:48  '...all generations shall call be blessed,' is used in James 5:11 and it is translated happy. 'Behold we count them 'happy' who endure.'

Nowhere in Scripture does Jesus, or anyone else, direct any praise, glory, or veneration to Mary. Elizabeth, Mary’s relative, praised Mary in Luke 1:42-44, but her praise is based on the blessing of giving birth to the Messiah. It was not based on any inherent glory in Mary.
 

* Used by the Angel (1:28) However, the best manuscripts omit 'blessed art thou among women'. It is used by Elizabeth (1:42).'Blessed art thou among women (not above them) and blessed is the fruit of thy womb.' It is used by Mary but as you can see a different Greek word is used - (makarismos).. '...from henceforth all generations shall call be blessed.'(1:48)

Question:
Do these words, 'blessed art thou among women', support the veneration, adoration, supplication and exaltation of Mary?

Answer: NO.